Speak French with me: your plans for the weekend

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Speak French with me: your plans for the weekend

What are you doing this weekend?

Do you have any plans this weekend?

With friends and colleagues, questions about the weekend and planned projects come up regularly.

So it's important that you're comfortable with this topic in French. Welcome to this new French video. Today, I'm going to teach you the basic questions and vocabulary for talking about your plans for the weekend.

As always, don't forget that you can download the free review sheet for the words and phrases in this video. Just click on the link in the description.

Let's start with the questions a French person might ask you if they want to know what you have planned for this weekend, for next weekend.

What are you doing this weekend? What are you doing this weekend? What are you doing this weekend? You, we'll use it if there's a formal relationship, so we'll use the formal form of address, or if we're talking about several people.

For example, if someone wants to ask you what you're going to do this weekend with your wife, the person might say, "What are you going to do this weekend?"

What are your plans this weekend? What are your plans this weekend?

Don't hesitate to pause so that you, too, can repeat these phrases and ask other people the same questions.

A French speaker can also tell you... Do you have any plans this weekend? Do you have any plans this weekend?

What are you doing this weekend? What are you doing this weekend?

The wording can also be... Are you doing anything special this weekend? You're doing something special this weekend.

Is there anything special about the weekend for you?

You can also hear... What are your plans for the weekend or what are your plans for the weekend? In the plural or formal form, we'd say what are your plans for the weekend or what are your plans for the weekend?

And a little phrase to boot, once the weekend's over. For example, if it's Monday at work, during the coffee break, this is another subject that will come up very frequently.

We're going to ask you what you did over the weekend. So someone can ask... What did you do this weekend? Or: did you do anything this weekend? Or: did you do anything special this weekend? This is past tense.

Let's look at some interesting vocabulary for talking about weekend plans. If you don't like going out too much, you can say... I don't have any plans. I'm going to stay home or I'm staying home this weekend.

Nothing special. Nothing special means it's a normal weekend. You're going to stay home, maybe do a couple of things, but you don't have a special event. And if you're tired, you might want to sleep in.

Sleeping in means sleeping longer than usual. On Saturday, I'm going to sleep in until at least 11 a.m.

If you like to stay at home rather than go out, maybe that means you're a homebody. You could say... I stay at home, I'm a homebody.

That means you don't really like going out. Other activities you can plan include watching series or movies. It's going to rain this weekend.

I just plan to watch movies with my boyfriend. If you're staying at home, you might also be doing some cleaning. I plan to do some cleaning.

If you're more of a morning person, so you like to get up early, you can have a coffee with a friend or say: I've got a coffee planned. Or you could have brunch. I'm going to brunch at a new restaurant on Sunday.

Let's take a quick break from the vocabulary we're looking at. I tell you all the time, when you're learning new words or expressions in French, it's very important to anchor them in your head, to see or hear them used in a real context.

I've already told you about Lingopie many times. You know, it's a streaming platform dedicated to language learning.

Today, I'm going to tell you about a special tool on this platform. It has developed a dictionary, but not just any dictionary. The tool fetches extracts from series, films and videos using the word you've typed. Today, for example, we've just learned the word casanier to describe someone who doesn't like to leave the house.

You see, when you type it into the platform, you can see a video clip with the use of this word. You can also try sleeping in.

I think this tool is really great because sometimes you hear an expression once, and then when you want to reuse it yourself, you don't quite know how to use it. So this dictionary lets you make the words you've just learned more concrete.

If you want to test this platform, you get seven days free and if you decide to continue because you like it, you get -70 % on the lifetime subscription using the link I put in the description.

Now let's get back to some other useful words to talk about your plans for the weekend. For next weekend, you can plan to go to the movies. I'm going to the cinema.

You can also plan to go to the museum. I'm going to the museum or we're going to the museum, if there are several of you. Among the cultural activities you can do, there's also... Going to see a play.

Going to a concert.

If you have kids or the weather is nice and you feel like having a picnic, you can say... I'm going to the park this weekend or I'm going to the park this weekend.

You can also plan to visit family or friends. This weekend, I'm visiting friends in Marseille.

If you're going away for the weekend, but don't feel like going into detail about who you're going to see or what you're going to do, you can simply say... I'm going away for the weekend. Or specify, I'm going for a weekend by the sea, I'm going for a weekend in the mountains.

If you're someone who likes to party, to see friends, you can also go for a drink. I'm planning to go for a drink with some friends. If you're even more of a party person, if you like to party even more, you might go to a party. So I'm having a party with friends. So a party, you can use it just to talk about the evening, but if someone says they're having a party, it means they're having a party. And if you like partying even more, maybe you'll go to a nightclub, if you like dancing.

This weekend, I'm going out clubbing with some friends. This weekend, I'm going clubbing.

If you're a sporty person, you may be planning to go to the gym. Very often, we shorten and don't say à la salle de gym. We just say je vais à la salle and thanks to the context, everyone understands.

Once again, if you like sport, you may be planning to go cycling. The weather's going to be fine. I'm planning to go for a bike ride. I'm going to a match. I'm going to see the France-Spain match.

If you're a studious student, maybe you're planning to work on your French. You might say... I'm going to do my homework. If you're taking a French course and the teacher has given you some homework.

How would you respond to someone sharing their plans for the weekend?

Well, you could say... It looks great! It looks great!

If the person has a lot planned, a busy schedule, we can simply answer... What a schedule! What a program! If the person tells you they're not going to do anything at all, that they just want to rest. Sometimes it's good to do nothing. Sometimes it's good to do nothing.

Again, if you know the person is planning to do nothing or is particularly tired. You can say... Rest well this weekend. Get a good rest this weekend.

If you leave work just before the weekend, you can tell your colleagues or your friend... Have a nice weekend! Have a nice weekend! 

Have a nice weekend! Have a nice weekend! In plural or if you're addressing the person politely.

If you know the person is going to do something really nice over the weekend, you can say... Enjoy your weekend! Enjoy your weekend!

I'd now like to invite you to listen to a short conversation that takes up some of the vocabulary we've just seen. Feel free to listen to it several times, or to pause it, so that you too can answer the questions in this dialogue.

It's finally Friday! Do you have any plans this weekend?

Yes, tonight I'm going to the theater with a friend. On Saturday, I'm planning to sleep in and go to the museum in the afternoon, and on Sunday I'm going to brunch.

What a program! Sounds great!

Are you doing anything special this weekend?

No! Nothing special. I plan to stay home.

You're right, sometimes it's good to do nothing.

That's for sure. But I still have to do a bit of housework and my errands for the week.

Have a nice weekend.

Enjoy your weekend too!

What are your plans for the weekend? Do you have anything special planned, or is it your usual weekend?

Don't hesitate to answer orally or write in the comments to work on your French. I hope you've enjoyed this video, learned some new words and enriched your French vocabulary.

Don't forget that you can download the card to revise all these expressions. See you soon.

Don't forget to "like" the video if you liked it and to subscribe to see more French content. See you soon.

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